Ken Taylor's Mondo Prints Unleashed

Posted by Grey Sunday, April 7, 2013

Australian artist Ken Taylor was unleashed last month at the "Stout & Taylor" show at Mondo Gallery with fellow artist Tyler Stout. With Mondo releasing some of his latest and greatest works from the show, The Daily Zombies takes a look at Taylor's awesome renditions of iconic films throughout the years. 



Earlier last month, we took a sneak preview at Mondo's gathering of the dynamic duo Ken Taylor and Tyler Stout with the "Stout & Taylor" show at the Mondo Gallery. While our enthusiasm for the show is perfectly justified given our well-documented admiration for both critically acclaimed artist here at The Daily Zombies. With Mondo announcing the release of a good number of Australian artist Ken Taylor's work from the show of late, we took an extensive look at his recent works.

Hit the jump to check out Taylor's fascinating take on these iconic films complete with his take on these prints courtesy of a recent interview Taylor had with Collider:


Beetlejuice by Ken Taylor
24″x36″ screen print. 
$50 regular edition of 400
$75 variant edition of 205
Hand numbered. Signed by Ken Taylor. 
Printed by D&L Screenprinting. 




“I didn’t really want to do a poster that was just a straight-out picture of Beetlejuice himself; it seemed like a bit of an obvious decision.   And besides, the two things I always remembered from the film were the Sandworm and Beetlejuice.   Paying tribute to the Sandworm seemed like the right choice, and it also gave me a reason to incorporate the house in there.  In the movie, it’s almost a secondary character, y’know?   Seemed like it needed to be shown in there.   It also gave me the opportunity to play with a more dramatic composition rather than something portrait-based.”


First Blood by Ken Taylor
24″x36″ screen print. 
Hand numbered. Signed by Ken Taylor. 
$50 regular edition of 400
$75 variant edition of 215
Printed by D&L Screenprinting.



“Y’know, it started with the idea of having the poster feature the chase sequence rather than the typical image, which is Rambo with a big knife or a gun.  So, with First Blood, I thought that (Rambo) was carrying so much baggage in the film that I didn’t want to use that image because…well, for one thing, that’s what people would immediately expect.  I wanted to see the emotion in his face, so the idea of having the chase sequence behind his head is that—while it is actually happening—there’s a lot of it that does happen in his head, like with these flashbacks to Vietnam.  The chase is fueled  just as much by his bad memories as it is anything else…I mean, that movie just doesn’t have any happy ending.  Well, either he or his people signed off on it, but I did hear Brian Dennehy liked it.”


Silence of the Lambs by Ken Taylor 
24″x36″ screen print. 
Hand numbered. Signed by Ken Taylor. 
$50 regular edition of 400
$75 variant edition of 205
Printed by D&L Screenprinting. 




“Well, actually, that was another one where there was just a list of approved images that we had to use, and (Sir Anthony Hopkins) had several reference images we needed to choose from.  The portrait is supposed to be sort-of arresting;   I think when people see it on the wall they’ll see what I mean.  It was designed that way, with a few other things in mind.  First, I remembered that scene where…it’s in one of the other Lecter films–Hannibal, I’m pretty sure– where they’ve brought him into the nurse at that hospital they have him in, and he just sort of…suddenly whips his head forward and attacks her.  Those little lines, the ones radiating out from his body, over on the right?  They’re designed to look like switchblades, but they’re also supposed to be, like…action lines, like maybe he’s just suddenly turned his head to stare at you.  There’s a ton of detail in that one when you get up close to it.”


Watchmen by Ken Taylor
21″x36″ screen print. 
Hand numbered. Signed by Ken Taylor. 
$50 regular edition of 400
$75 variant edition of 205
Printed by D&L Screenprinting.



“That was probably our most…observed piece from this show, the one where the studio was most involved.  There were certain images they definitely wanted us to use, images they didn’t really want us to use…the studio definitely had input with that one, not that that’s a bad thing, or that they were ever unpleasant to work with.  It went great, it was just a matter of (figuring out what the studio wanted from the piece).” 


Metropolis by Ken Taylor 
15″x36″ screen print. 
Hand numbered. Signed by Ken Taylor. 
$50 regular edition of 400
$75 variant edition of 205
Printed by D&L Screenprinting. 




“Definitely one of my favorites from the show.  Probably my favorite, actually.  I first saw Metropolis when I was in art school.  It was something that (the students) were told to go and have a look at.  It’s stood the test of time for almost a hundred years, the set design’s so incredible.  I have a real passion for that sort-of art-deco look.  It’s something I incorporate into gig posters a lot, and it played to my strengths, design-wise.  It was a logical choice for me.   It’s weird and complex, and you can get a vibe off it in ways that are translated by design instead of just the story…so, you can almost get away with transferring the film to a poster just by using those elements of design rather than anything more story-based.”


An American Werewolf in London by Ken Taylor 
36″x24″ screen print. 
Hand numbered. Signed by Ken Taylor. 
$50 regular edition of 400
$75 variant edition of 205
Printed by D&L Screenprinting. 




“Yeah, that’s another one where I didn’t wanna do just another print with the werewolf.  I hadn’t watched the film for many, many years, but what did stick out after all that time was the scene in the subway and the scene where he gets attacked on the moors.   So, I went with the London Underground scene, and when I rewatched the movie I realized we never saw the aftermath of that scene with the guy on the escalator.  I started wondering about what might’ve happened after that, if he’d been flung to another platform or ripped apart entirely or if the tube station had been shut down…”







0 comments

Post a Comment

Presented in Zombie-Vision TV

Star Wars: The Force Awakens - Final Trailer

Posted by The Daily Zombies

Darth Vader & 501st Legion vs. Aliens

Posted by The Daily Zombies
Sep-17-2017

7 Zombie Survival Tactics That Will Get You Killed

Posted by The Daily Zombies
Jun-1-2017

Star Wars Portrait Series by Mike Mitchell & Mondo

Posted by The Daily Zombies
Jan-31-2017

Sadako vs. Kayako: Zombie of the Week

Posted by The Daily Zombies
Jun-3-2016

Captain America: Civil War - First Look

Posted by The Daily Zombies
Nov-25-2015

Suicide Squad: New Images

Posted by The Daily Zombies
Oct-29-2015

Star Wars: The Force Awakens - Final Trailer

Posted by The Daily Zombies
Oct-20-2015

Facebook of the Dead

Death Toll Or Rather Lack Thereof...

decaying walking corpses, compelled by their unshakably irresistible hunger for human flesh, had gotten their daily fix of brain tissue. Want some?

Undead United